Electric Power Basics

electricity-3442835_1280

Power.

That is the word commonly used in every day language to refer to electricity. But what is really the electrical power?

To describe the meaning of electrical power, we need to dig into our knowledge of mechanical physics. In physics, power is the ratio at which energy is consumed or, in other words, is the number representing the energy used divided by the time needed to actually consume it.

Another way to say it is in terms of work. The energy consumed is, in fact, the work done on the system, so we can say that the power is the work done on the system in a certain amount of time.

In mechanical physics, the power is measured in Joules/Second, and the unit for it is called Watt, in honor of James Watt, a Scottish inventor, engineer and chemist of the 18th century that did a lot of work on the subjects of energy and power in mechanical systems.

power

Now that we have refreshed our knowledge on the concept of power, let’s see if we can find an equivalent way of defining it in the realm of electricity.

In terms of electricity, we need to consider the energy used to move the electrical charges, which is still a work, and it is done by the generator that powers the electrical circuit.

We know already how to measure the electric potential energy in electrical circuits: that is done by the voltage, which provides the energy per unit of charge:

voltage

From the voltage we can derive the energy itself:

energy

Now we have our energy consumed in the system to move the charges around. The electrical power is that energy divided by the time spent to use that energy:

el_power

Very interesting result, isn’t it? To calculate the electrical power we just need to multiply the voltage used to power the circuit by the current that flows into it. And, again, this power is measured in Watts, so the product of Volt and Ampere gives us the amount of watts used by the circuit.

Now that we have the formula for the power, it is easy to figure out how much power a generator provides when connected to a circuit. We just multiply the voltage of the generator by the current that is flowing through it.

And the power consumed by a load is the product of the voltage applied to the load and the current that flows through it.

Is the power provided by a generator the same as the one consumed by a load?

Well, in both cases we can measure it in Watts. However, in the first case the power goes out of the generator, while in the second case the power goes in to the load. We just need to establish a rule to make sure we can distinguish the direction in which the power flows.

We say that the power is negative when it goes out of a device and it is positive when it goes in.

So, in an electrical circuit with a generator and a load, the power is negative at the generator and is positive at the load. But the absolute amount in both cases is the same, and the sum of the two powers is therefore zero.

In fact, we have just verified the physics law of conservation of energy: in a closed system (the electric circuit), the total amount of energy never changes. The amount of energy produced by the generator equals the amount of energy absorbed by the load and, therefore, in any time interval (thus the power), the total is zero and never changes.

To conclude, we have talked about the electrical power. We have compared the way the power is calculated in mechanical systems with the way the power is calculated in electrical systems.

We have stated the rule to provide a sign to the power, and we have verified that this rule satisfies the law of the conservation of energy.

These concepts are general enough to apply to both DC and AC circuits. However, I will come back on these concepts in a future article to see how calculations are affected by loads having different electrical properties.

In the mean time, you can get some more information by watching the companion video on the Electrical Power that I recently published on my YouTube channel.

And, as always…

Happy Experiments!